4.1
37 reviews
82

Ubuntu 8.04 LTS "Hardy Heron"


Released April, 2008

Product Shot 1 The Pros:Freely distributed. Available as a "Live" CD to try it out before installing. Simple installation through Wubi.

The Cons:Not all commercial software has Linux versions or ports. Missing drivers for proprietary hardware. Fails to support a large amount of recent Samsung monitors. Fix is available but requires low-level engineering and cannot be performed by new users!

Ubuntu 8.04 LTS, nicknamed "Hardy Heron," is the most recent LTS release of the Ubuntu Linux operating system. It is the eighth Ubuntu release, and the second long-term support (LTS) release.

Product Shot 2 The Desktop edition will be supported until April 2011, and the server edition will be supported until April 2013.

Screenshot

 

screenshot: default 800x600 desktop of Ubuntu 8.04 "Hardy Heron"

Availability

Ubuntu is free, and will remain free. As with the other releases, it is available in both desktop and server editions. A free install CD may be requested, however the shipping process may take 6-10 weeks. For more information, see Ubuntu.

Installation    

Ubuntu 8.04 has a completely revamped install system for Windows, called Wubi (Windows-Based Ubuntu Installer.) It allows users to install Ubuntu just like they install any other program on Windows, without having to partition their hard drive. It also allows for easier installs of the full operating system, and migrates users settings, such as backgrounds and bookmarks, to Ubuntu. A version for Mac, Mubi, is expected to be released soon.

User Reviews (40)

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Add Pros & Cons
82
ProScore
Pros
  • 33

    Freely distributed

  • 31

    Available as a "Live" CD to try it out before installing

  • 27

    Simple installation through Wubi.

  • 27

    Available in desktop and server versions

  • 23

    Very easy to install new open source applications.

  • 21

    Excellent usability

  • 4

    Very secure operating system (also for viruses, etc)

  • 4

    Open source so that anybody can inspect the code

  • 3

    Free alternatives to almost any 'commercial quality' programs.

  • 2

    Very helpful community

  • 0

    Has all the ui gimmicks you could want

Cons
  • 25

    Not all commercial software has Linux versions or ports

  • 1

    Missing drivers for proprietary hardware.

  • 0

    Fails to support a large amount of recent Samsung monitors. Fix is available but requires low-level engineering and cannot be performed by new users!

  • -3

    Hard to uninstall applications

  • -3

    Automatic updates break commercial software like VMWare

  • -17

    Missing drivers for most new hardware.

Comments (13)

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dialupinternetuser
dialupinternetuser: #ubuntu_8_04_lts_hardy_heron I'll try that out after I install Ubuntu once I get a new motherboard, processor, and power supply. And case. And probably a new hard drive. Of which I will be getting soon. May 28, 08
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Manzabar
Manzabar: #ubuntu_8_04_lts_hardy_heron @dialupinternetuser: Correct, Amarok is a KDE program and installing it will install all the require libraries. The only way this should affect your system is you'll have used up more disk space and any future KDE programs you want to try out should have some of their dependencies already installed. May 27, 08
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dialupinternetuser
dialupinternetuser: #ubuntu_8_04_lts_hardy_heron

@ Manazabar: Amarok is technically a KDE program, which means I need to install a ton of KDE libraries. How does this affect my system? I only want to run GNOME. I wouldn't mind having the KDE files on my computer, as long as they don't do anything.

May 25, 08
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dialupinternetuser
dialupinternetuser: #ubuntu_8_04_lts_hardy_heron So I tried out Wubi on one of our high schools computers and it installed perfectly. Told it the partition size, gave it a user/pass, hit install and that was it. Very nice. It gave me a boot menu at startup and worked great. It picked up our schools private Novell (ugh) network and prompted me for information. Didn't try putting anything in. Ran some programs, which looked pretty and worked great. Uninstall was just as easy with Wubi, and the school's IT people never knew a thing. (I hope). May 25, 08
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Manzabar
Manzabar: #ubuntu_8_04_lts_hardy_heron Ah, in that case I'd recommend trying Amarok. May 19, 08
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dialupinternetuser
dialupinternetuser: #ubuntu_8_04_lts_hardy_heron It wasn't Ubuntu's default look I didn't like, it was Rythmbox's look. Which is harder to change. And JuK, for KDE, is even worse. It looks bad and has no functions. Apr 29, 08
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Manzabar
Manzabar: #ubuntu_8_04_lts_hardy_heron @dailupinternetuser: If you don't care for Ubuntu's default look, you can change it. Also many of people who prefer how Windows looks tend to like the KDE desktop environment (vs. Ubuntu's default of Gnome). If you want to play around with Ubuntu & KDE you can either install KDE through Ubuntu's package installer or use the Kubuntu version of Ubuntu. Apr 29, 08
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rabidpotatochip
rabidpotatochip: #ubuntu_8_04_lts_hardy_heron I run MythTV on an Ubuntu system in my living room. Unfortunately, the kernel in Gutsy Gibbon broke the timing on my serial IR blaster, but downgrading to Feisty Fawn fixed it. Hardy Heron is also supposed to fix it as well, but it'll be a few days before that claim can be tested.

On a semi-unrelated note, while Ubuntu is very simple for the novice to average user the fact that most Windows software can't run on Linux is the biggest turn-off for most people. I think once Wine picks up a bit more Ubuntu will probably ride on that success. Apr 23, 08
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dialupinternetuser
dialupinternetuser: #ubuntu_8_04_lts_hardy_heron I ran Ubuntu for about a month on a really old spare computer I came across. It is the easiest Linux distro I have ever installed, and runs nicely. As long as you enable extra repositories and the Medibuntu repositories, all the software you ever need is easy to install, including plugins for Firefox. The only cons were that not all the software you install would get added to the menus, and that all the media organizers aren't that good. They also don't have the sleek look of those running on Windows. The computer I had was too old to try to emulate Window's applications. It also has very good data CD/DVD and ISO creations. Mar 9, 08
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exumer
exumer: #ubuntu_8_04_lts_hardy_heron From experience, ubutnu is very easy to install and use. the menus are very intuitive which helps a person new to linux navigate through their system. the only cons i would have with this operatins sytem is their software package installer (when i try to install plug ins for mozilla, they would not work, i guess due to the wrapper used to install them. which i hate as well), when i tried intsalling ubuntu onto my laptop, it would not support my nvidia graphics card so i could not go past the loading screen. I have found other versions of linux that i like way more than ubuntu, including Fedora, ZenWalk, and Mandriva. Mar 9, 08
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dialupinternetuser
dialupinternetuser: #ubuntu_8_04_lts_hardy_heron Downloading Ubuntu is much easier than downloading other distro's. I have had experience with Debian before, and I would get speeds of about 20kB/s when I downloaded the OS install CD's, but with Ubuntu I almost maxed out my connection. Feb 15, 08
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michaelshores
michaelshores: #ubuntu_8_04_lts_hardy_heron I have been running Ubuntu on a pair of notebook computers for about nine months. Initially installed 7.04 on each and have subsequently upgraded to 7.10. The upgrade process was very smooth. I have yet to experience my first system crash. Ubuntu and open source applications can easily meet the needs of 80% of all computer users. Jan 8, 08
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Omar
Omar: #ubuntu_8_04_lts_hardy_heron A Eee-specific version of Ubuntu was released recently, so I think I'm going to try that out as soon as I can find a cheap SDHC card to boot from. I don't want to mess with the default installation, and I want to make sure everything is hunky-dory before doing a complete switch.

Ubuntu reminds me of OSX in a lot of ways. It has a user friendly interface, but you have access to the deep and powerful Unix architecture underneath. Of course you don't have the SAME kind of usability as OSX, but from what I've experienced, it's not bad. Dec 17, 07
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